Rogers celebrates OCD Awareness week in style

10/14/17 09:00:pm
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Multiple Rogers locations have found unique and fun ways to participate in OCD Awareness Week this year.

Rogers–Nashville created themed days for OCD Awareness week, inviting both patients and staff to join in. Monday’s theme was to wear mismatched socks to serve as an example of exposure that would challenge the need for symmetry, which is a common obsession for those with OCD. Additional days had the theme of dressing up like an emoticon, wearing teal to support OCD awareness, wearing something uncomfortable, and searing something superstitious or taboo.

The Appleton campus participated in OCD Awareness Week in similar ways. On one day, staff wore mismatched clothes to show that it was ok to be imperfect and they also hung up a sheet of paper where staff and patients could write down intrusive thoughts, something that affects not only those with OCD but many others.

Rogers–Chicago set up a display that included encouraging messages to those with OCD, balloons and other fun decorations, and star-shaped stress relievers colored teal for OCD awareness

Three Rogers locations also hosted screenings for the “Unstuck: a kids OCD movie” with panel discussions during the events as well. The screenings were held in Nashville, Skokie and St. Louis Park and they had a combined attendance of around 300 people. 

The Nashville screening for “Unstuck” was attended by almost 200 people and was emceed by local radio host Ty Bentli. The film’s producer, Chris Baier, was skyped into the event, along with his daughters Vanessa and Charlotte, who are two stars of the film. Dr. Stephanie Eken, medical director, and Dr. Amy Mariaskin, clinical director, spoke about OCD awareness and a guest speaker also shared her own personal experience with OCD.

The “Unstuck” screening in St. Louis Park was the first-ever community event hosted by Rogers–Minneapolis, which was held at Groves Academy. More than 70 guests attended the event, which included speeches about personal experiences with OCD from two children, an adult, and a mother. Rogers–Chicago hosted its screening at the Skokie Public Library and had a panel of experts, including past patients and parents of past patients, answering questions from the audience.

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